Storm Facts

Additional questions about proper disinfection procedures and other potential health problems related to the storm can be directed to the local Board of Health in each city or town. This information is provided by the Community Sanitation Program.
  1. Flooding
  2. Homes & Buildings
  3. Injury Prevention
  4. Power Failure & Food Safety
  5. Wells
  6. Yards
If a person must come into contact with the floodwater they should take the following general precautions:
  • Check in on elderly or chronically ill neighbors to make sure that they are safe.
  • General use of Immune Globulin (IG) injections for hepatitis A is not being recommended. However, individuals should consult with their primary health care provider if they have significant underlying health problems or are immunocompromised (e.g., on steroid therapy, chemotherapy for cancer, has HIV or some other disease that weakens the immune system).
  • Health care providers should be contacted if an individual becomes ill with fever, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea after exposure to possibly contaminated flood waters.
  • If there has been personal exposure to the flood waters, bathe or shower thoroughly with soap and water and wash all contaminated clothing in hot water and a detergent.
  • Keep all children and pets out of the floodwater.
  • Keep contact time with flood waters to a minimum and avoid splashing. It is especially important to keep the water out of mouth, eyes and nose.
  • Make sure all gas and electric utilities to the affected area are turned off by appropriate persons before you enter.
  • Make sure tetanus immunization is up to date for any person who is exposed to flood waters. For most adults, having received a tetanus booster within the past 10 years is adequate. For children, parents should check with their pediatrician to make sure the tetanus vaccination is up to date.
  • Wear waterproof boots, gloves, eye protection and clothes that are either water resistant or disposable.